The Microbial Burden of Interior Surfaces and Spaces in Main Administrative Buildings of Covenant University

doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v4i11.24

Authors

  • Solomon U. Oranusi Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science and Technology, Covenant University, Ota. Ogun State, Nigeria
  • Oluwatomisin Akinkunmi Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science and Technology, Covenant University, Ota. Ogun State, Nigeria
  • Elizabeth A. Onibokun Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science and Technology, Covenant University, Ota. Ogun State, Nigeria
  • Bunmi K. Olopade Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science and Technology, Covenant University, Ota. Ogun State, Nigeria
  • Oyewumi O. Oshamika Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science and Technology, Covenant University, Ota. Ogun State, Nigeria
  • Yemisi D. Obafemi Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science and Technology, Covenant University, Ota. Ogun State, Nigeria

Keywords:

Total aerobic plate count (TAPC), Work environments, Indoor air, Microbial population

Abstract

The microbial population within working environments contribute greatly to employee efficiency and health. This study was carried out to investigate the distribution of microorganisms in indoor spaces of key administrative buildings within Covenant University. Microbial species from indoor air and surfaces of six administrative buildings were isolated using standard laboratory procedures. Isolates were then identified following standard biochemical tests for bacteria and microscopy for fungi. Antibiotics susceptibility profile of the pure bacterial isolates was determined. Total aerobic plate count (TAPC) and fungal count for air samples ranged from 5.4 x 101 - 1.1 x 102 CFU/mL and 4.9 x 101 – 1.3 x 102 CFU/mL respectively. For surface samples TAPC and fungal counts ranged from 4.5 x 101 - 1.2 x 102 and 2.3 x 101 – 1.0 x 102 CFU/mL, respectively. Bacterial species isolated include members of Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Bacillus genera while fungi isolates belonged to Aspergillus, Penicillium, Alternaria, Neurospora genera as well as unidentified yeast nd Mucor sp. The bacterial isolates were mostly resistant to Ceftazidime n=23 (76.7%) and equally susceptible to Ofloxacin and Gentamycin n=19 (63.3%). Findings from the study showed that the minimum microbial population correlated with the office least visited by students. 

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Published

2020-11-01

How to Cite

Oranusi, S. U., Akinkunmi, O., Onibokun, E. A., Olopade, B. K., Oshamika, O. O., & Obafemi, Y. D. (2020). The Microbial Burden of Interior Surfaces and Spaces in Main Administrative Buildings of Covenant University: doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v4i11.24. Tropical Journal of Natural Product Research (TJNPR), 4(11), 985–989. Retrieved from https://tjnpr.org/index.php/home/article/view/968