Total Phenolics, Flavonoids Contents and Antioxidant Activity in Different Flavor Plants in Northeast (Isaan) Thailand: Enhancing Commercial Value

http://www.doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v7i11.14

Authors

  • Wannachai Chantan Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham Province 44150, Thailand.
  • Watchara​ Kanchanarach Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham Province 44150, Thailand.
  • Pakin Noppawan Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham Province 44150, Thailand.
  • Chanapon Khunwong Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham Province 44150, Thailand.
  • Chadaporn Senakun Walai Rukhavej Botanical Research Institute, Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham Province 44150, Thailand.
  • Sombat Appamaraka Walai Rukhavej Botanical Research Institute, Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham Province 44150, Thailand.
  • Namtip Cumrae Faculty of Environment and Resource studies Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham Province 44150, Thailand.
  • Sarinthree Udchachone Mahasarakham Business School, Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham Province 44150, Thailand.
  • Sirithon Siriamornpun Department of Food Technology, Faculty of Technology, Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham Province 44150, Thailand.
  • Wilawan Promprom Plant and Innovation Research Unit, Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham Province 44150, Thailand.

Keywords:

Northeast Thailand, commercial value, antioxidant activity, flavonoids, phenolics, Flavour plants

Abstract

This study focuses on the ethnobotanical and antioxidant properties of seasoning plants used in food, assessing 33 flavored plant species' total phenolic and flavonoid content, along with their antioxidant capabilities. The research employed the Folin-Ciocalteu method to determine total phenolic content (TPC), while total flavonoid content (TFC) was measured using the aluminum chloride colorimetric assay. Antioxidant capacity was gauged through DPPH assays, and seasoning plant flavors were categorized based on taste testing. The findings revealed 23 plant families and 33 distinct species employed in food flavoring, divided into 4 to 5 flavor categories encompassing 13 variations of highly spicy plants from the Lamiaceae family, 9 sweet-flavored varieties, 6 savory or delicious-flavored types, and 5 sour-flavored options. Among these, Brassica juncea displayed the most remarkable production of phenolic compounds and substantial flavonoid content, accompanied by the highest antioxidant activity (IC50 value of 66.08 ± 1.85 µg/ml) within the spicy category. Allium ascalonicum exhibited the highest antioxidant activity among sweet-tasting plants, featuring noteworthy phenolic compound and flavonoid concentrations (IC50 value of 126.70 µg/ml). Additionally, the study identified plants contributing to sour and salty or umami tastes, with Bauhinia malabarica and Clochidion littorale presenting significant concentrations of phenolic compounds and flavonoids, accompanied by notable IC50 values (95.31 ± 0.28 and 67.18 ± 2.15 µg/ml, respectively). This research offers valuable insights into the phytochemical constituents and therapeutic potential of seasoning plants used in traditional medicine and the food industry.

Author Biography

Wannachai Chantan, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham Province 44150, Thailand.

Plant and Innovation Research Unit, Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham Province 44150, Thailand.

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Published

2023-12-01

How to Cite

Chantan, W., Kanchanarach, W., Noppawan, P., Khunwong, C., Senakun, C., Appamaraka, S., … Promprom, W. (2023). Total Phenolics, Flavonoids Contents and Antioxidant Activity in Different Flavor Plants in Northeast (Isaan) Thailand: Enhancing Commercial Value: http://www.doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v7i11.14. Tropical Journal of Natural Product Research (TJNPR), 7(11), 5115–5122. Retrieved from https://tjnpr.org/index.php/home/article/view/3011