Effect of Aqueous Extract of Momordica charantia on Survival, Locomotive Behaviour and Antioxidant Status of Drosophila melanogaster

doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v5i1.23

Authors

  • Opeyemi C. De-Campos Department of Biochemistry, College of Science and Technology, Covenant University, Canaan Land, PMB 1023 Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria
  • Modupe P. Layole Department of Biochemistry, College of Science and Technology, Covenant University, Canaan Land, PMB 1023 Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria
  • Franklyn N. Iheagwam Department of Biochemistry, College of Science and Technology, Covenant University, Canaan Land, PMB 1023 Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria
  • Solomon O. Rotimi Department of Biochemistry, College of Science and Technology, Covenant University, Canaan Land, PMB 1023 Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria
  • Shalom N. Chinedu Department of Biochemistry, College of Science and Technology, Covenant University, Canaan Land, PMB 1023 Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria

Keywords:

M. charantia, Survival rate, D. melanogaster, Locomotive Behaviour, Antioxidant

Abstract

Momordica charantia, commonly known as bitter gourd, is a therapeutic plant popularly known for its antidiabetic potential in folklore medicine. This study investigated the effect of aqueous leaf extract of M. charantia (AMC) on survival rate, locomotive behaviour and antioxidant response in Drosophila melanogaster. Adult flies were fed with different concentrations of AMC (0-100 mg/mL) for 12 days, and their locomotive behaviour and whole-body antioxidant status were assessed at 0, 2, 4 and 8 mg/mL of AMC. Results showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the survival rate and locomotive behaviour of flies at 8, 16 and 50 mg/mL of AMC compared to the control. There was no significant difference in malondialdehyde content, GSH level and SOD activity of flies exposed to 2, 4, and 8 mg/mL of AMC compared to the control group. Glutathione-s-transferase activity at 8 mg/mL of AMC increased significantly (p < 0.05) when compared to the control group. Acetylcholinesterase activity also increased in a dose-dependent manner with a significant increase at 4 and 8 mg/mL of AMC. The evidence from this study suggests that low to moderate doses of aqueous extract of Momordica charantia slightly improved survival rate of flies. It also increased the activities of acetylcholinesterase and antioxidant enzymes. 

Author Biographies

Opeyemi C. De-Campos, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science and Technology, Covenant University, Canaan Land, PMB 1023 Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria

Covenant University Public Health and Wellbeing Research Cluster (CUPHERC),Covenant University, Canaan Land, PMB 1023 Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria

Franklyn N. Iheagwam, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science and Technology, Covenant University, Canaan Land, PMB 1023 Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria

Covenant University Public Health and Wellbeing Research Cluster (CUPHERC),Covenant University, Canaan Land, PMB 1023 Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria

Solomon O. Rotimi, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science and Technology, Covenant University, Canaan Land, PMB 1023 Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria

Covenant University Public Health and Wellbeing Research Cluster (CUPHERC),Covenant University, Canaan Land, PMB 1023 Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria

Shalom N. Chinedu, Department of Biochemistry, College of Science and Technology, Covenant University, Canaan Land, PMB 1023 Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria

Covenant University Public Health and Wellbeing Research Cluster (CUPHERC),Covenant University, Canaan Land, PMB 1023 Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria

References

Yakubu OF, Adebayo AH, Famakinwa TO, Adegbite OS, Ishola TA, Imonikhe LO, Adeyemi OA, Awotoye OA, Iweala EEJ. Antimicrobial and toxicological studies of Ricinodendron Heudelotii (Baill.). Asian J Pharm Clin Res. 2018; 11:299-305.

Iheagwam NF, Okeke CO, Decampos OC, Okere DU, Ogunlana OO, Chinedu SN. Safety evaluation of Terminalia catappa Linn (Combretaceae) aqueous leaf extract: Sub-acute cardio-toxicopathological studies in albino Wistar rats. J Phys Conf Ser. 2019; 1299 012109:1-6.

Mazzari ALDA and Prieto JM. Herbal medicines in Brazil: Pharmacokinetic profile and potential herb-drug interactions. Front Pharmacol. 2014; 5:162.

Amaeze OU, Aderemi-Williams RI, Ayo-Vaughan MA, Ogundemuren DA, Ogunmola DS, Anyika EN. Herbal medicine use among Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Nigeria: understanding the magnitude and predictors of use. Int J Clin Pharm. 2018; 40(3):580-588.

Dandawate PR, Subramaniam D, Padhye SB, Anant S. Bitter melon: A panacea for inflammation and cancer, Chin J Nat Med. 2016; 14(2):81-100.

Akinsiku AA, Ajanaku KO, Adebisi AA, Edobor-Osoh A, Aladesuyi O, Samson TO, Dare EO. Momordica charantia stem extract mediated biogenic synthesis of silver nanoparticles: Optical and antimicrobial efficacy. IOP Conf Ser Mater Sci Eng. 2019; 509(1):012018.

Farooqi AA, Khalid S, Tahir F, Sabitaliyevich UY, Yaylim I, Attarf R, Xu, B. Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) as a rich source of bioactive components to combat cancer naturally: Are we on the right track to fully unlock its potential as inhibitor of deregulated signalling pathways. Food Chem Toxicol. 2018; 119:98-105.

Joseph B and Jini D. Antidiabetic effects of Momordica charantia (bitter melon) and its medicinal potency. Asian Pacific J Trop Dis. 2013: 3(2):93-102.

Yamaguchi M and Yoshida H. Drosophila as a model organism. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2018; 1076:1-10.

Aryal B and Lee Y. Disease model organism for Parkinson disease: Drosophila melanogaster. BMB Rep. 2019; 52(4):250-258.

Baenas N and Wagner AE. Drosophila melanogaster as an alternative model organism in nutrigenomics. Genes Nutr. 2019; 14(1):1-11

Abolaji OA, Kamdem PJ, Lugokenski TH, Nascimento KT, Waczuk PE, Farombi, OE Loreto DEL, Rocha TJB. Involvement of oxidative stress in 4-vinylcyclohexeneinduced toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster, Free Radic Biol Med. 2014; 71:99-108.

Pinho FVSD-A, Da Silva GF, Macedo GE, Muller KR, Martins IK, Ternes APL, da Costa JGM, Athayde ML, Boligon AA, Kamdem JP, Franco JL, de Menezes IRA, and Posser T. Phytochemical constituents and toxicity of Duguetia furfuracea hydroalcoholic extract in Drosophila melanogaster. Evidence-based Compl Altern Med. 2014; 2014:838101.

Rotimi SO, Bankole GE, Adelani IB, Rotimi OA. Hesperidin prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxicity in rats. Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol.2016; 38(5):364-371.

Ohkawa H, Ohishi N, Yagi K. Assay for lipid peroxides in animal tissues by thiobarbituric acid reaction. Anal Biochem. 1979; 95(2):351-358.

Habig WH, Pabst MJ, Jakoby WB. Glutathione S transferases. The first enzymatic step in mercapturic acid formation. J Biol Chem. 1974; 249(22):7130-7139.

Marklund S and Marklund G. Involvement of the superoxide anion radical in the autoxidation of pyrogallol and a convenient assay for superoxide dismutase. Eur J Biochem. 1974; 47(3):469-474.

Moron MS, Depierre JW, Mannervik B. Levels of glutathione, glutathione reductase and glutathione Stransferase activities in rat lung and liver. BBA - Gen Subj. 1979; 582(1):67-78.

Ellman GL, Courtney KD, Andres V, Featherstone RM. A new and rapid colorimetric determination of acetylcholinesterase activity. Biochem Pharmacol. 1961; 7(2):88-95.

Lowry OH, Rosebrough NJ, Farr Al, Randall RJ. Protein measurement with the Folin phenol reagent. J Biol Chem.1951; 193(1):265-275.

Mirończuk-Chodakowska I, Witkowska AM, Zujko ME. Endogenous non-enzymatic antioxidants in the human body. Adv Med Sci. 2018; 63(1):68-78.

Robaczewska J, Kedziora-Kornatowska K, Kozakiewicz M, Zary-Sikorska E, Pawluk H, Pawliszak W, Kedziora J. Role of glutathione metabolism and glutathione-related antioxidant defense systems in hypertension. J PhysiolPharmacol. 2016; 67(3):331-337.

Wang Y, Branicky R, Noë A, Hekimi S. Superoxide dismutases: Dual roles in controlling ROS damage and regulating ROS signalling. J Cell Biol. 2018; 217(6):1915-1928.

Thapa S, Lv M, Xu H. Acetylcholinesterase: A primary target for drugs and insecticides. Mini-Rev Med Chem. 2017; 17(17):1665-1676.

Francisco EBJ, Echeverria MG, Paula ZA, da Silva FG, da Cruz CL, Aline AB, de Menezes IRA., Jeferson LF Thaís P. Oxidant effects and toxicity of Croton campestris in Drosophila melanogaster. Pharm Biol. 2016; 54:3068-3077.

Ventrella E, Adamski Z, Chudzińska E, MiądowiczKobielska M, Marciniak P, Büyükgüzel E, Büyükgüzel K, Erdem M, Falabella P, Scrano L, Bufo SA. Solanum tuberosum and Lycopersicon esculentum leaf extracts and single metabolites affect development and reproduction of

Drosophila melanogaster. PLoS One 2016; 11(5):e0155958.

Riaz B, Zahoor MK, Zahoor MA, Majeed HN, Javed I, Ahmad A, Jabeen F, Zulhussnain M, Sultana K. Toxicity, phytochemical composition, and enzyme inhibitory activities of some indigenous weed plant extracts in fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Evidence-based Compl

Altern Med. 2018; 2018:2325659.

Khan MF, Abutaha N, Nasr FA, Alqahtani AS, Noman OM, Wadaan MAM. Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) possess developmental toxicity as revealed by screening the seeds and fruit extracts in zebrafish embryos. BMC ComplAltern Med. 2019; 19(1):184.

Deshmukh NS. Safety assessment of McB-E60 (extract of a Momordica sp.): Subchronic toxicity study in rats. Toxicol Rep. 2016; 3:481-489.

Downloads

Published

2021-01-01

How to Cite

C. De-Campos, O., P. Layole, M., N. Iheagwam, F., O. Rotimi, S., & N. Chinedu, S. (2021). Effect of Aqueous Extract of Momordica charantia on Survival, Locomotive Behaviour and Antioxidant Status of Drosophila melanogaster: doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v5i1.23. Tropical Journal of Natural Product Research (TJNPR), 5(1), 178–181. Retrieved from https://tjnpr.org/index.php/home/article/view/247