In vivo Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Derris reticulata Ethanol Extract

doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v5i1.13

Authors

  • Krittiya Thisayakorn Department of Pharmaceuticals and Natural Products, Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technology Research (TISTR), Techno Polis, Thailand
  • Nantiya Joycharat Faculty of Traditional Thai Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand
  • Thaweeporn Keereekoch Faculty of Traditional Thai Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand
  • Bodin Chatawatee Faculty of Traditional Thai Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand
  • Katesarin Maneenoon Faculty of Traditional Thai Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand
  • Sasitorn Chusri Faculty of Traditional Thai Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand
  • Nongluk Kunworarath Natural Product Research Center of Excellence, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand

Keywords:

Derris reticulata, Anti-inflammatory activity, Ear edema, Paw edema, In vivo studies

Abstract

Derris reticulata Craib. has been used in Thai traditional medicine to treat various inflammatory diseases. Recently, D. reticulata extract has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) secretion and the expression of various mRNAs in stimulated macrophage cells. However, studies of its anti-inflammatory effects in an animal model have not been performed. The study evaluated the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of an ethanol extract of the wood of D. reticulata (DRE). The anti-inflammatory effect of DRE on ethyl phenylpropiolate (EPP)-induced ear edema and carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats was studied. Furthermore, the NO scavenging activity and phytochemical contents of the DRE were determined. The results showed that the most abundant phytochemical compound was lupinifolin, followed by total proanthocyanidin, total phenolic compounds, and total flavonoids. DRE also exhibited NO scavenging activity (15.8 - 49.7%) while 1%, 5%, and 10% DRE promoted a significant reduction of inflammation in EPP-induced rat ear edema (35.0 - 52.5%) and carrageenan-induced rat paw edema (28.1 - 41.0%). The study revealed that DRE possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties in animal models. The results confirm the efficacy of the traditional use of D. reticulata in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. 

Author Biographies

Nantiya Joycharat, Faculty of Traditional Thai Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand

 Natural Product Research Center of Excellence, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand

 

Sasitorn Chusri, Faculty of Traditional Thai Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand

Natural Product Research Center of Excellence, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand

References

Julier Z, Park AJ, Briquez PS, Martino MM. Promoting tissue regeneration by modulating the immune system. Acta Biomater. 2017; 53:13-28.

Kaur BP and Secord E. Innate immunity. Pediatr Clin North Am. 2019; 66(5):905-911.

Sugimoto M, Sousa LP, Pinho V, Perretti M, Teixeira MM. Resolution of inflammation: what controls its onset?. Front Immunol. 2016; 7:160.

Blaser H, Dostert C, Mak TW, Brenner D. TNF and ROS crosstalk in inflammation. Trends Cell Biol. 2016; 26(4):249-261.

Winterboum CC, Kettle AJ, Hampton MB. Reactive oxygen species and neutrophil function. Annu Rev Biochem. 2016; 85:765-792.

Fang FC and Vázquez-Torres A. Reactive nitrogen species in host-bacterial interactions. Curr Opin Immunol. 2019; 60:96-102.

Lee M, Rey K, Besler K, Wang C, Choy J. Immunobiology of nitric oxide and regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Results Probl Cell

Differ. 2017; 62:181-207.

Murata M. Inflammation and cancer. Environ Health Prev Med 2018; 23:50.

Geng S, Chen K, Yuan R, Peng L, Maitra U, Diao N, Chun C, Zhang Y, Hu Y, Qi CF, Pierce S, Ling W, Xiong H, Li L. The persistence of low-grade

inflammatory monocytes contributes to aggravated atherosclerosis. Nat Commun. 2016; 7:13436.

Lüscher TF. Inflammation: the new cardiovascular risk factor. Eur Heart J. 2018; 39(38):3483-3487.

Issarachot P, Sangkaew W, Sianglum W, Saeloh D, Limsuwan S, Voravuthikunchai SP, Joycharat N. α-Glucosidase inhibitory, antibacterial, and antioxidant activities of natural substances from the wood of Derris reticulata Craib. Nat Prod Res. 2019; DOI

1080/14786419.2019.1678610.

Prawat H, Mahidol C, Ruchirawat S. Reinvestigation of Derris reticulata. Pharm Biol. 2000; 38 (suppl. 1):63-7.

El-Halawany AM, El Dine RS, Chung MH, Nishihara T, Hattori M. Screening for estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities of plants growing in Egypt and Thailand. Pharmacogn Res. 2011; 3:107-13.

Pulbutr P, Rattanakiat S, Phetsaardeiam N, Modtaku P, Denchai R, Jaruchotikamol A, Khunawattanakul W. Anticariogenic activities of Derris reticulata ethanolic stem extract against Streptococcus mutans. Pak J Biol Sci. 2018; 21:300-306.

Kumkrai P, Kamonwannasit S, Chudapongse N. Cytoprotective and anti-diabetic effects of Derris reticulata aqueous extract. J Physiol Biochem. 2014; 70:675-684.

Kumkrai P, Weeranantanapan O, Chudapongse N. Antioxidant, α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and subchronic toxicity of Derris reticulata extract: its antidiabetic potential. BMC Compl Altern Med. 2015; 15:35.

Vongnam T, Wittayalertpanya S, Raungrungsi N, Limpanasithikul W. Inhibitory effect of Derris reticulata ethanol extract on LPS-induced macrophage activation. Asian Biomed. 2013; 7:89.

Joycharat N, Boonma C, Thammavong S, Yingyongnarongkul BE, Limsuwan S, Voravuthikunchai SP. Chemical constituents and

biological activities of Albizia myriophylla wood. Pharm Biol. 2016; 54:62-73.

Joycharat N, Thammavong S, Limsuwan S, Homlaead S, Voravuthikunchai SP, Yingyongnarongkul BE, Dejadisai S, Subhadhirasakul S. Antibacterial substances from Albizia myriophylla wood against cariogenic Streptococcus mutans. Arch Pharm Res. 2013; 36:723-730.

Hsieh M-C, Shen Y-J, Kuo Y-H, Hwang LS. Antioxidative activity and active compounds of longan(Dimocarpus longan Lour.) flower extracts. J Agric Food Chem. 2008; 56:7010-7016.

Zhishen J, Mengcheng T, Jianming W. The determination of flavonoid contents in mulberry and their scavenging effects on superoxide radicals. Food Chem. 1999; 64:555-559.

Ariffin F, Heong Chew S, Bhupinder K, Karim AA, Huda N. Antioxidant capacity and phenolic composition of fermented Centella asiatica herbal teas. J Sci Food Agric. 2011; 91:2731-2739.

Basu S and Hazra B. Evaluation of nitric oxide scavenging activity, in vitro and ex vivo, of selected medicinal plants traditionally used in inflammatory diseases. Phytother Res. 2006; 20:896-900.

Dunstan CA, Noreen Y, Serrano G, Cox PA, Perera P, Bohlin L. Evaluation of some Samoan and Peruvian medicinal plants by prostaglandin biosynthesis and rat ear oedema assays. J Ethnopharmacol. 1997; 57(1):35-56.

Morris CJ. Carrageenan-induced paw edema in the rat and mouse. Methods Mol Biol. 2003; 225:115-121.

Grisham MB, Jourd'Heuil D, Wink DA. Nitric oxide. I. Physiological chemistry of nitric oxide and its metabolites:implications in inflammation. Am J Physiol. 1999; 276:315-321.

Calixto JB, Otuki MF, Santos AR. Anti-inflammatory compounds of plant origin. Part I. Action on arachidonic acid pathway, nitric oxide and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB). Planta Med. 2003; 69:973-983.

González-Gallego J, García-Mediavilla MV, SánchezCampos S, Tuñón MJ. Fruit polyphenols, immunity and inflammation. Br J Nutr. 2010; 3(104):15-27.

Kunworarath N, Rangkadilok N, Suriyo T, Thiantanawat A, Satayavivad J. Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nitric oxide production in macrophages by suppressing NF-κB and AP-1 signaling pathways. J Ethnopharmacol. 2016; 179:156-161.

Chivapat P, Chavalittumrong P, Attawith A, Soonthornchareonnon N. Toxicity study of lupinifolin from stem of Derris reticulata Craib. J Thai Trad Alt Med. 2009; 7:146-55.

Yusook K. Antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereus of lupinifolin from the stem of Derris reticulataCraib. J Thai Trad Altern Med. 2017; 15:362-370.

Yusook K, Weeranantanapan O, Hua Y, Kumkrai P, Chudapongse N. Lupinifolin from Derris reticulata possesses bactericidal activity on Staphylococcus aureus by disrupting bacterial cell membrane. J Nat Med. 2017; 71:357-366.

Ho SC, Hwang LS, Shen YJ, Lin CC. Suppressive effect of a proanthocyanidin-rich extract from longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) flowers on nitric oxide production in LPS-stimulated macrophage cells. J Agric Food Chem. 2007; 55:10664-10670.

Mendes LF, Gaspar VM, Conde TA, Mano JF, Duarte IF. Flavonoid-mediated immunomodulation of human macrophages involves key metabolites and metabolic pathways. Sci Rep. 2019; 9:14906.

Tran PL, Tran PT, Tran HNK, Lee S, Kim O, Min BS, Lee JH. A prenylated flavonoid, 10-oxomornigrol F, exhibits anti-inflammatory effects by activating the Nrf2/heme oxygenase-1 pathway in macrophage cells. Int Immunopharmacol. 2018; 55:165-173.

Prasad SK, Laloo D, Kumar M, Hemalatha S. Antidiarrhoeal evaluation of root extract, its bioactive fraction, and lupinifolin isolated from Eriosema chinense. Planta Med. 2013; 79:1620-1627.

Downloads

Published

2021-01-01

How to Cite

Thisayakorn, K., Joycharat, N., Thaweeporn Keereekoch, Chatawatee, B., Maneenoon, K., Chusri, S., & Kunworarath, N. (2021). In vivo Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Derris reticulata Ethanol Extract: doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v5i1.13. Tropical Journal of Natural Product Research (TJNPR), 5(1), 100–104. Retrieved from https://tjnpr.org/index.php/home/article/view/232