Erratum Bioethanol Production from Pineapple and Cassava Peels Using Fungal Isolates as Inoculants

http://www.doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v6i9.27

Authors

  • Nnyeneime U. Bassey Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, Federal College of Dental Technology and Therapy, Trans-Ekulu, Nigeria
  • Eze E. Ajaegbu Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, Federal College of Dental Technology and Therapy, Trans-Ekulu, Nigeria
  • Florence O. Nduka Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, Federal College of Dental Technology and Therapy, Trans-Ekulu, Nigeria
  • Juliet O. Nwigwe Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, Federal College of Dental Technology and Therapy, Trans-Ekulu, Nigeria
  • Ijeoma O. Okolo Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, Federal College of Dental Technology and Therapy, Trans-Ekulu, Nigeria
  • Adaora L. Onuora Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, Federal College of Dental Technology and Therapy, Trans-Ekulu, Nigeria
  • Ese S. Izekor Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, Federal College of Dental Technology and Therapy, Trans-Ekulu, Nigeria
  • Bob Mgbeje Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Calabar, Nigeria

Keywords:

Bioethanol,, , fermentation,, pineapple peels,, cassava peels,, inoculants,, fungi.

Abstract

Globally, the production of biofuels as an alternative energy source from renewable raw materials to complement energy needs has become of utmost importance. The goal of this study was to compare bioethanol production from pineapple and white cassava peels utilizing inoculants such as Neurospora crassa, Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cassava and pineapple peels were obtained from the white cassava and abacaxi pineapple, respectively. The fungal isolates: Neurospora crassa, Aspergillus oryzae, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated from burnt wood, steamed rice, and fresh palm wine (from oil palm) at 37ºC. Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA) at pH 5.6 was used to grow the fungal isolates, and morphological observations were used to confirm the isolates. The substrates were fermented with different inoculant combinations, distilled on days 4 and 8, and the physicochemical parameters were determined. The results showed that Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in combination gave the highest bioethanol yield of 48.67±5.7 ml with the pineapple peels at day 8; whereas Aspergillus oryzae and Neurospora crassa in combination gave the highest bioethanol yield of 38.33±2.03 ml with the cassava peels at day 4. This observation was statistically significant (p<0.05). The findings led to the conclusion that pineapple peels have a higher bioethanol yield than cassava peels. The inoculants utilized in this research work indicate the best prospects for bioethanol production from abacaxi pineapple and white cassava.

 

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Published

2022-10-01

How to Cite

U. Bassey, N., E. Ajaegbu, E., O. Nduka, F., O. Nwigwe, J., O. Okolo, I., L. Onuora, A., … Mgbeje, B. (2022). Erratum Bioethanol Production from Pineapple and Cassava Peels Using Fungal Isolates as Inoculants: http://www.doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v6i9.27. Tropical Journal of Natural Product Research (TJNPR), 6(10), 1497–1503. Retrieved from https://tjnpr.org/index.php/home/article/view/1359

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