Anticonvulsant Studies on Ethanol Leaf Extract of Cadaba farinosa Forssk. in Experimental Models

doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v6i8.21

Authors

  • Muhammad A. Tijjani Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
  • Hamidu Usman Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
  • Aishatu Muhammad Department of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Kaduna State University, Kaduna State, Nigeria
  • Mohammed G. Magaji Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria
  • Abdullahi H. Yaro Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Bayero University, Kano, Kano State, Nigeria
  • Halimatu S. Hassan Department of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria
  • Umar U. Pateh Department of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria
  • Mohammed I. Sule Department of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria
  • Lawan B. Inuwa Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria

Keywords:

Electroshock,, Pentylenetetrazole,, Cadaba farinosa,, Strychnine,, 4-aminopyridine,, Seizure.

Abstract

Cadaba farinosa Forssk. is widely distributed in tropical and sub-tropical regions. It is used in the treatment of pains, dysentery, rheumatism, cough, fever, as antidote and neurological disorders. The study evaluated the anticonvulsant activity of the ethanol leaf extract (CEE) of the plant in Swiss mice using maximal electroshock test (MEST), pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), strychnine (STN) and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) induced seizures tests. The intraperitoneal (i.p.) median lethal dose (LD50) of CEE was found to be 2154.1 mg/kg body weight in mice. There was no significant protection against maximal electroshock induced seizures in all treated groups and no difference in their mean recovery time. Only the standard drug (phenytoin) showed 40% protection. The extract did not protect the mice against pentylenetetrazole induced seizures at all doses. However, there was significant increase in the mean onset of seizures at all doses. There was significant (p ≤ 0.05) 16.7% protection exhibited by the extract at 150 and 300 mg/kg. The extract at 75 mg/kg exhibited the highest protection of 83.3% against STN induced seizures in mice. At 75 mg/kg the extract exhibited highest protection of 83.3% against strychnine induced seizures in mice. Phenobarbitone caused an increase in the mean onset with 50% protection. The extract (300 mg/kg) offered 100% protection against 4-aminopyridine induced seizures in mice higher than that produced by phenobarbitone. However, there was no significant difference in the onset of seizure in the unprotected animals. The results suggest that ethanol leaf extract of Cadaba farinosa possesses anticonvulsant properties.

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Published

2022-08-01

How to Cite

A. Tijjani, M., Usman, H., Muhammad, A., G. Magaji, M., H. Yaro, A., S. Hassan, H., … B. Inuwa, L. (2022). Anticonvulsant Studies on Ethanol Leaf Extract of Cadaba farinosa Forssk. in Experimental Models: doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v6i8.21. Tropical Journal of Natural Product Research (TJNPR), 6(8), 1286–1289. Retrieved from https://tjnpr.org/index.php/home/article/view/1309

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