Effect of Different Single Doses of CT Scan on DNA Fragmentation and Oxidative Stress in the Blood of Healthy Young Adults in Baghdad, Iraq

Hiba O. Muhammed1, Hussain S. Hasan1, Qasim S. Al-Mayah2*
1Department of Physiology and Medical Physics, College of Medicine, Al-Nahrain University, Baghdad, Iraq.
2Medical Research Unit, College of Medicine, Al-Nahrain University, Baghdad, Iraq

Corresponding Author: sciencefond2015@gmail.com; Tel: 00964 770 454 9713
Recieved Date: July 16, 2020; Accepted Date: December 15, 2020; Published Date: 02 January 2021
Citation: Muhammed HO, Hasan HS, Haraj QS. Effect of Different Single Doses of CT Scan on DNA Fragmentation and Oxidative Stress in the Blood of Healthy Young Adults in Baghdad, Iraq. Trop J Nat Prod Res. 2020; 4(12):1045-1049.  https://doi.org/10.26538/tjnpr/v4i12.4
Copyright: © 2020 Muhammed et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
ABSTRACT

Ionizing radiation (IR) induces many cellular changes by direct and indirect interactions, which alters multiple cellular processes, causing DNA damage and reactive oxygen species-induced biochemical disturbances. This study aimed at investigating the effect of various doses of computed Tomography (CT) scanning on the fragmentation of DNA and oxidative stress in healthy young adults.
The DNA damages associated with different doses of CT scan was explored using alkaline comet assay. Serum concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) in each sample was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). There was a significantly higher percent of DNA fragmentation in the blood samples subjected to high dose of radiation (120 kV-210 mAs-21sec) than those exposed to lower doses. Furthermore, the serum concentration of MDA was proportional to the intensity of radiation. Therefore, DNA fragmentation can be associated with high doses of CT radiation, maybe due to radiation-induced oxidative stress.

Keywords: Ionizing radiation, Oxidative stress, DNA Fragmentation, comet assay.
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